Tag Archives: ValleyWag

Valleywag Is Coming Back!

ValleywagI still haven’t forgotten the sting that came when Valleywag was folded into Gawker, at which point it began a slow, pitiful death. I was a big fan of the blog, which had an amazing contributor base. To a certain extent, I learned the basics of blogging (and more) from them. Well, Nick Denton tells Business Insider that Valleywag is coming back, and I couldn’t be more psyched.

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Day One with the new Valleywag

valleywag1Well, I was nervous about yesterday. Valleywag was cut down to one staffer, and I got ready for the site to suck. I mean, that’s what happens when you axe your entire staff except one and fold it into another publication as a column. I read Valleywag yesterday — at Valleywag.com, not on Gawker.com — and the coverage hasn’t suffered.

So, mad props to Owen Thomas. To the rest, you’re still missed.

My favorite election-related “tweet”

twitter_logo_sI love Twitter, though not nearly as much as one of my day job colleagues. During major news events, there is always a flurry of “tweeting” (i.e., using Twitter), and the election, of course, was no exception. My favorite from the election run was by Alaska Miller, a contributor to ValleyWag, which regular Migrant Blogger readers know is one of my favorite blogs. Get his thoughts after the jump.

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Migrant Blogger on ValleyWag: Leading Hotels of the World

Remember my story on Leading Hotels of the World this weekend? Well, it got some love from the good folks at ValleyWag. I’m pretty psyched about this. I’m starting to run ValleyWag-, Fleshbot- and Gawker-caliber stories on my blog. So, let the fame roll in. Cash would be better.

Check out the story on ValleyWag >>

Again “Commenter of the Day” on ValleyWag

I know it’s meaningless, but it’s still fun. I’m addicted to ValleyWag commenting, even more than I am to the other Gawker blogs. Well, today I picked up “Commenter of the Day” props on ValleyWag for a nice crack I made about the kid who hacked hopeful Veep Sarah Palin’s Yahoo! Mail account. A judge released the kid without bail, but forbade him to “own a computer or to use the Internet for anything other than email and classwork.” Well, I found two problems with this decision:

 

1. He can use the internet for e-mail. Did the judge specify whose account?
2. His next assignment for school: how to screw up a candidate’s vice presidential hopes and dreams.

And for that, I get asshole of the day respect.

My thoughts on citizen journalism

Unlike a lot of people in my line of work, I suspect, I’m a big fan of citizen journalism. I read it, and I participate in it. Perhaps I could be a bit more active, but I write something when the mood hits me. My recent stories have been on private equity investment trends in China and the manufacture of phthalate-free dildos. So, why do I do it?

Honestly, I don’t have to. I have gained some decent traction as a freelance writer this year, with articles in Penthouse and Boston magazine, not to mention some high-profile rejections. And, my work is picked up routinely by Fleshbot and ValleyWag … and from time to time by Gawker. So, I shouldn’t have to “stoop so low,” right?

Wrong.

I find that citizen journalism does a few things right. First, it is a great way to communicate as much news as possible. Quite frankly, the publishing business is designed to let good stories fall through the cracks. You have to pitch the mag, hope our idea aligns well enough with its editorial calendar and finally write and publish. This means that several good stories fall away. I had one pitch go out to several high-profile magazines. All said it was a great story, just not right for them. This wasn’t a line of shit. If they didn’t care, they would have ignored me (which has happened in the past).

So, a lot of good stuff is never communicated. I think that’s a damned shame.

Next, citizen journalism makes it easy to get news out quickly. When I get a story, I can go right to “press.” Normal, mainstream publications don’t work that way. Even if you have a good relationship with an editor and publish online instead of in print (which I prefer), it can still take a few days to get a story out. It’s easy to get scooped (happened to me by a day with the Zivity story I wrote for AVN Online in January 2008).

Finally, citizen journalism empowers the people closest to the news. If you seen news happen, you can get the story out. Fast. Easy. The way it’s supposed to be done.

Sure, most citizen journalism websites lack the writing panache of major publications, but they make up for it with breadth of coverage. If nothing else, the readers get to decide … resulting in a market-driven solution. Since newspapers and magazines are not non-profits, it should be the readers who decide winners and losers. This is a great formula.

Citizen journalism seems to be gaining steam. Popular website OhmyNews.com, which is mostly non-United States, continues to get copious amounts of press coverage. I noticed today that art market blogger Nick Forrest, of ArtMarketBlog.com, has begun to write art market opinion pieces for my current citizen journalism fave, DigitalJournal.com. Whether he is just looking to drive traffic to his blog or has become a citizen journalism convert, the fact that he is writing at all– let alone voluminously– tells the whole story. He is investing his time in citizen journalism.

“Real” journalists may feel that citizen journalism is beneath them, but I don’t think they realize that this is yet another threat to the old way of doing business that they seek to defend. The old school journalists are losing. They tried to stay in print, and the web has gained momentum. They tried to rely on “proper” journalism, but the blogs have encroached on their market. Now, there is yet another threat, and it is developing a readership.

The old way of doing journalism continues to lose ground.

If nothing else, I like citizen journalism for the instant gratification. When I come upon a story, I can write it and post it immediately. I get feedback quickly. Further, the major blogs evaluate the story on its merits rather than where it was published. Both Fleshbot and ValleyWag have picked up my stories for Digital Journal and OhmyNews. They are looking at the information rather than the masthead. This shows me that the world is changing.

I vote for citizen journalism with my time. You should, too.

ValleyWag gets it right on NYT and print

As everyone should know by now, the Migrant Blogger hates print. It still tends to pay the bills better than online journalism, and the prestige factor is probably a big part of that. After all, to be in a publication that has limited space, you have to be pretty damned good. This thinking is what holds reporters back.

Well, it seems as though I have a kindred spirit at the NY Times. Technology editor Damon Darlin is looking to beef up his online team, ValleyWag reports. NYT staffer David Carr predicts that the “horizon line for when a newspaper on the street is serving as a kind of brochure of a rich online product does not seem far off” (also in the ValleyWag article).

It’s about fucking time.

You can tell a better story online than in print, and you can do it in real-time, as the story unfolds. Being first to market matters, as the reporter will not be constrained by a production process. This is where real journalism will happen … hopefully not too long in the future.

I, for one, am sick of waiting for printers to finish printing.

Facebook at Century 21 Prices

If you’ve never been to a Century 21 store, you’re missing an experience. I picked up an Armani suit there on the cheap (leftover, damaged, some-damn-thing), not to mention a Ted Baker shirt for around $50. It’s where you go in Manhattan for discounts. Where do you go in Silicon Valley? Apparently, Facebook.

As I mentioned yesterday, Facebook has put together a deal to allow employees to cash out of some of their pre-IPO shares. It’s generous, and from a business perspective, it makes sense. The only problem is that it has called Facebook’s claimed (and probably bullshit) valuation into question. They are allowing employees to sell shares based on a $15 billion valuation, which is based on the last equity investment made in the company.

Today, ValleyWag has reported that many Facebook employees agree with my assessment of the company’s valuation. Plenty of employees are trying to dump their holdings, several at a third of the company’s “perceived” value. Some could look at this cynically, perhaps as a lack of faith in Facebook. I get this. A year ago, we were talking about the invulnerability of MySpace, and now, the war appears to be long won.

But, I don’t think anything that jaded is at play.

Instead, I think employees want to take advantage of an opportunity to cash out, which is unsurprising when you figure that these guys probably have a shitload of compensation tied up in their equity holdings. And, I think they are being realistic about the value of the company. $15 billion is absurd; $5 billion is a thrid less absurd.

Again, I can’t shake my CMGi visions when I read this shit. It’s all coming back. At least I’ll have something to cover for a while.

Murdoch not tipping his hand, insanity?

Rupert Murdoch must have a hell of a strategy, because what he’s doing doesn’t seem to make a damned bit of sense. Yesterday, word got out that he is taking the Ottaway Newspaper chain off the market. With declining newspaper valuations– not to mention that Ottaway is one of the most profitable pieces of the Dow Jones empire (at least before they chopped it with a divestiture in late 2006)– this is probably not stupid. But, ValleyWag suggests that Murdoch is interested in picking up a piece of former internet giant Yahoo!.

Didn’t the Aussie learn something about new media when he bought MySpace, only to have it eclipsed almost immediately by Facebook? Yeah, smart. That was $500 million well-spent. So, now he’ll go after a Web 1.0 has-been, for some purpose that only he can understand. He’s either a genius or a complete moron. Buying MySpace and Yahoo! (which trail Facebook and Google) is like rooting for the Chicago Cubs or the Boston Bruins. You have to know that you’ll never hit the top.

But, Murdoch’s the rich one, not me. So, grain of salt and all that.