Tag Archives: print

Media World Dumber in 2010

Seriously, someone’s been munching on a shitload of paste. In Q2 2010, 44 more magazines launched than in 2010. This means two things (1) people have more money than they did last year and (2) they have no clue what the fuck to do with it. The former makes sense, given that in Q2 2009, we were still reeling from the September 2008 financial crisis. So, it would make sense that, as we turn the corner, there’s more money floating around … and it’s looking for a home.

And the latter? Yeah, fools and their money and such.

I don’t know what would possess someone to launch a dead-tree edition in this (or any) market. Look for the giant flushing sound in a few quarters. It will be those new magazines getting pushed through the plumbing.

via FishbowlNY

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Corporate Bloggers: Know the Challenges You’ll Face

Corporate blogging isn’t easy. The rewards are high, and this type of platform will reduce your workload over time (if you’re an in-house writer), though you’ll probably invest all that saved time in producing more content – especially if you’re addicted to returns. Some of the challenges aren’t immediately evident, and you’ll only encounter them when you’re knee-deep in the shit.

For mainstream bloggers, especially, you will run into some unexpected challenges. If you’re used to reblogging news stories or use press releases as a crutch when you’re short content, you’ll have to change your game.

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French newspapers gives up on revenue under new bailout

dsc04623Okay, we all know that the print industry is completely and totally screwed. Circulation is plummeting around the world … leaving ink jockeys little hope of keeping their jobs for the rest of their lives (which is really their only goal anyway). They may have hope, however, thanks to an unusual French bailout plan. Leave it to French job protectionism to set a model for the rest of the world. The folks at the NY Timeswhich rain this story – must be salivating right now.

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Blood flows at Condé Nast

graydon carterWhen the world around you is falling apart, there’s only one thing to do: find a new world.

While Condé Nast’s Vanity Fair was in the grip of severe layoffs, the editor decided not to be the bearer of bad news, taking a vacation instead. The NY Post didn’t say if he used Gadling to choose a destination, but we’re all hoping he did. The total discharged from Condé Nast is believed to be greater than 450 this year, and there are likely to be more to come among the contributing editors. The sizeable cut at Vanity Fair is largely the result of Carter’s decision to generally ignore the order to cut 5% of the crew late last year.

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Shots from the financial crisis

dsc_0491editedI just saw on Silicon Alley Insider that the Boston Globe is laying off 42 people. A friend of mine from my (few) days at Ottaway Newspapers works for Boston.com, the newspaper’s website, at last I heard. I hope he still has a job. When I dug into the article on SAI, I was shocked at the numbers I saw. I had no idea that the Globe’s circulation had fallen into the shitter. I know that Boston is a fairly small market, but the Globe is its major paper (or was).

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Newspapers Can’t Be Sold?

I read a crazy article in on nytimes.com this morning– part of the joy of not having a normal sleep pattern these days. Apparently, newspaper chains are having trouble selling off their properties. Big surprise, I know, given the imminent death of print, plummeting share prices and revenue bases that have been decimated. But, what I find interesting is the cluelessness that has led up to this.

I worked for the community news division of Dow Jones several years ago for about 10 minutes. Even in the brief time I was there, I learned how important acquisitions were to the company. Our fearless leader at the time, John Wilcox, indicated that part of the competitive landscape going forward would be the ability to win in the acquisition space. Newspaper chains would be competing to buy newspapers as much as they’d be competing for readers. He went on to discuss the different means available for acquiring newspapers.

What a difference three years makes …

Since then, Dow Jones sold several of its community newspapers in order to take advantage of a capital loss carryover. News Corp acquired the company and discussed selling off the Ottaway (i.e. community newspaper) properties, before taking them off the block due to lack of interest. Now, nobody is buying newspapers, including the once acqusition-hungry Gatehouse Media. In 2006, the question wasn’t “if?” but “how much?” Today, there is no question, just a statement: “not at any price.”

It’s not the death of print that’s surprising. Everybody saw that coming back in the go-go days of 1997. The sheer idiocy is in the fact that, as late as 2006, newspaper executives thought they’d be competing to buy print properties. Denial flowed strong, and they are now left with the consequences.