Monthly Archives: May 2010

Twitter’s New Ad Move: And What Comes Next

Twitter just announced that it’s no longer letting its users push their own sponsored tweets. It’s about time. I’m not opposed to sponsored tweets (quite the contrary, actually), but I see Twitter’s decision as a business necessity, and I’m glad the company is in the right frame of mind.

For a long time, Twitter was a great place to generate revenue … as long as you weren’t Twitter. I wrote about this several times for DailyFinance and BloggingStocks. Plenty of companies, especially those in the media sector, were including Twitter in their advertising deals, which opened up a new revenue stream for them.

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Social Media: An Old View of New Stuff

My first guest post for the hot social media blog SocialTimes just went up an hour ago. Take a look at the story, in which I delve into the notion that community development, two-way dialogue and all that other group hug stuff the social media “gurus” talk about isn’t the smartest way to go for B2B marketers. Rather, we should treat social media environments as we treat the internet as a whole: we have to go hunting for that proverbial needle in a haystack.

[Source: SocialTimes]

Twitter-Savvy Companies: Raytheon #2?!

Just how the hell did Raytheon land in the #2 spot? And, it’s #8 overall! Microsoft may seem surprising, but it really makes sense, given that it’s packed with professionals and has employees who are more likely to be on the leading edge. Over at Mashable, there are a few more charts about social media adoption that will blow your mind.

[Source: webtreatsetc via Mashable]

Skittishness Index: Few to Outsource Social Media

I took a look at this chart and almost lost my mind. I can understand the desire to maintain a certain amount of control internally, but the entire marketing world seems to be against outsourcing social media. That’s nuts! Social media, despite all the hype about “conversations with the marketplace” is really just another form of marketing. We need to come to grips with this. Anyone who remembers the dotcom days and has read the Cluetrain Manifesto realizes we’ve seen this movie before. It’s time to loosen up.

I see this chart as something of a snapshot. This (obviously) is where we are now, and I don’t think it’s going to be this way forever. Over time, as more businesses get a feel for social media marketing, they’ll start to outsource more comfortably. For now, this chart seems like a “Skittishness Index.”

[Source: MarketingSherpa]