Monthly Archives: November 2009

Five Survival Tips for Corporate Bloggers

Getting a corporate blog off the ground isn’t easy. Sure, the technology isn’t hard to master: any 12-year-old kid can get a blog up and running. The challenges you’ll find in launching and managing a corporate blog are in filling the damned thing. We’ve all heard that “content is king,” but delivering on that can be incredibly difficult. A day or two into your new blogging endeavor, you’ll realize just how hard it is to feed the beast as much as it needs. Don’t get discouraged. Take a deep breath, and look at the five tips below.

Continue reading

A New Art Show on the Upper West Side

Need an alternative to the traditional gallery scene? Check out the new art exhibition on the Upper West Side. Ten artists, calling themselves 25CPW, have taken over a vacant commercial space on Central Park West. Their new show, 10 from 25: Emerging Artists Using Photography, will run through December 13, 2009. Read the whole story at Luxist.

Corporate Bloggers: Memory Is Your Biggest Asset

Corporate bloggers use commodity technology to communicate their companies’ messages. The advantage seems to come from the content itself, because that’s where individual expertise, institutional knowledge and products and tools can be brought to bear. So, this is where corporate bloggers find their attention focused. After all, what else is there?

Well, plenty.

Though I hate the expression “best practices,” the corporate blogging space is suffering from an acute shortage of them. From pushing out content via Twitter to tagging and linking, there is no widely accepted standard for getting the most out of a corporate blog using kickass blogging techniques. Well, I’m going to try to change that … and I’d love to get some ideas from other bloggers. I’ll get the process started with my top recommendation: sharpen your memory.

Continue reading

An art auction failure linked to every Gen Xer’s fantasy

The art market isn’t sure if it wants to recover yet. This month, Sotheby’s had a fantastic contemporary art sale, while the one at Christie’s just plain sucked. Among the paintings at the latter was “Brother Sausage,” by Jean-Michel Basquiat. It entered the Christie’s art auction with the highest presale estimate, but nobody was interested in buying it.

Life’s a bitch.

What’s interesting, though, is where this painting comes from. Word on the street is that Peter Brant, turned art collector by his soon-to-be ex-wife, is trying to move the piece. He and Stephanie Seymour are battling their way through a divorce, and “Brother Sausage,” with a presale estimate that approached $10 million, is bound to be one of the assets they fight over.

Why does this matter to the millions of Gen Xers who don’t give a fuck about art? Or, to those of us who like art but still don’t give a shit about the squabbles of the rich and famous?

Continue reading

Goldman says sorry, ponies up $500 million for small businesses

For its role in the global financial crisis, which had an impact of several trillion dollars, Goldman Sachs feels just awful. The incredibly prestigious bank, one of the few to come through the market mayhem looking pretty damned good, wants you to know that it’s sorry. CEO Lloyd Blankfein said at a conference in New York, “We participated in things that were clearly wrong and have reason to regret.” And then, he pulled the trigger on the big one: “We apologize.”

Continue reading

Blog versus reblog and the content supply chain

dsc029091Every blogger does a bit of both: originating some stories and coverign those written by others. The latter is not only easier but gives you access to news and reporting resources that you may not be able to marshal on your own. And, counter intuitively, reblogged stories can get plenty of play — in traffic and other reblogs and retweets. But, there’s still a certain value in developing your own original news. Doing so is easier than you may think. To pump up the amount of original content on your blog, go retro: press releases.

Many believe that press releases are passé, but these tools can be quite useful.

Think through the “reblog supply chain.” Except for hardcore reporting (of which we’re seeing less and less in general, everywhere), most traditional outlets do a lot from press releases. When you’re reblogging one of these stories, you’re unnecessarily giving props to a media outlet that really only did what you could do on your own. Because of the reblog, you’re making yourself look disproportionately dependent on other outlets.

Stop the madness!

Continue reading

Publicists: tweet your coverage

twitter_logo_headerI’m still surprised by how little tweeting some publicists do. You’d think that they’d want to maximize the coverage their clients receive. Yet, I’m continually stunned by how little this happens. Active tweeting can kick off a virtuous cycle that benefits the writer, publicist and client.

For bloggers especially, performance matters. Success is defined by how much we write and how much it’s read. The presence of “tweet counters” on many blogs has made retweets a new metric, as well, even though it’s a subordinate measure of readership. As the retweets tick up, we look good. If we know that the publicist is part of the reason, there’s a pretty good chance we’ll cover your clients more. When this happens, the publicist wins: both coverage and readership are demonstrably higher (and the retainer, too, maybe?).

Continue reading